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So Big Corporations Don’t Take Control of the Web, FCC Outlines Actions To Preserve The Free And Open Internet September 21, 2009

Posted by David W. King in Uncategorized.
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Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Julius Genachowski outlined the concrete actions he believes the Commission must take to preserve the free and open Internet at a speech at The Brookings Institution.

“The Internet is an extraordinaryplatform for innovation, job creation, investment, and opportunity. It has unleashed the potential of entrepreneurs and enabled the launch and growth of small businesses across America,” said Chairman Genachowski. “It is vital that we safeguard the free and open Internet.”

The Commission previouslyembraced four open Internet principles affirming that consumers must be able to access the lawful Internet content, applications, and services of their choice, and attach non-harmful devices to the network. These four principles guide the FCC’s existing case- by-case enforcement of communications law.

In today’s speech, Chairman Genachowski proposed the addition of two new principles. The first would prevent Internet access providers from discriminating against particular Internet content or applications, while allowing for reasonable network management. The second principle would ensure that Internet access providers are transparent about the network management practices theyimplement. The Chairman also proposed clarifying that all six principles applyto all platforms that access the Internet.

Chairman Genachowski will seek to begin the process of codifying the Commission’s existing four open Internet principles, along with the two additional principles, through a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) at the October meeting. The NPRM will ask for input and feedback on the proposed rules and their application, such as how to determine whether network management practices are reasonable, what information broadband providers should disclose about their network management practices and how the rules apply to differing platforms, including mobile Internet access services.

“I look forward to working with my Commission colleagues on this important initiative,” Chairman Genachowski said. “Commissioners Copps, McDowell, Clyburn, and Baker each bring a unique and important perspective to the complex issues at stake and I look forward to getting their input and insight when we kick-off the rulemaking process next month.” As part of Chairman Genachowski’s commitment to openness and transparency, the FCC launched a new website, http://www.openInternet.gov to encourage public participation.

For more information:
http://www.openInternet.gov

Global Online Population To Hit 2.2 Billion By 2013 July 28, 2009

Posted by David W. King in Uncategorized.
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The number of people online around the world will grow more than 45 percent to 2.2 billion users over the next five years, according to a new report by Forrester Research, Inc.z

Asia remains the biggest global Internet growth engine: 43 percent of the world’s online population will reside in Asia by 2013, with 17 percent of the global online population in China.

Growth rates in the US, Western Europe, and the major industrialized nations in Asia Pacific such as Australia, Japan, and South Korea will slow to between 1 percent and 3 percent.

Online penetration in the US is set to rise from 73 percent to 82 percent over the next five years, representing about a 3 percent annual growth rate.

Europe. Europe’s Internet growth will be fueled by the continent’s emerging markets.

Internet usage in Russia and Turkey will grow by almost 8 percent annually, while growth in Spain’s online population will increase by an average of more than 5 percent each year.

Other Asian countries with substantial online growth rates include India, Indonesia, Pakistan, and the Philippines.

Countries With The Most Internet Users: 2008

1. China
3. Japan
4. Brazil
5. China
2. India
4. Japan
5. Brazil

Countries With The Most Internet Users: 2013

1. China
2. US
3. India
4. Japan
5. Brazil

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Broadband Connection: Are You Getting What You Have Paid For? July 28, 2009

Posted by David W. King in Uncategorized.
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When downloading music, video, pages and other material from the internet, do your downloads slow to a crawl? Do you think that with the internet connection you are suppose to have your downloads would be faster?

If your broadband speed is not what you thought you were paying for, this is more than simply a perception.

Broadband customers receive only half the speed they pay for when downloading music, pages, films and other material from the internet, Ofcom discloses in a definitive survey which confirms suspicions that services are far slower than advertised.

While most customers in the UK subscribe to packages offering “up to 8 Mbit/s” (mega bits per second) nine major broadband companies delivered only 4.1 Mbit/s, 57 per cent of the “headline rate”. No customers achieved the top speed; the maximum was 7.1 Mbit/s.

Ofcom found significant differences between internet service providers (ISPs). Tiscali 8 Mbit/s customers received on average 3.2 to 3.7, while AOL and BT struggled to deliver much more than 4 Mbit/s. By contrast, Virgin Media’s “up to 10 Mbit/s” cable package delivered 8.1 Mbit/s, far superior to the other packages.

The report UK Broadband Speeds 2009 said the major factor determining speed was distance between homes and broadband exchanges; homes more than 2km away were much slower.
To check current speeds, Ofcom commissioned the specialist company SamKnows to check the rates delivered by the nine biggest providers – AOL; BT; O2; Orange; Plusnet; Sky; TalkTalk; Tiscali; and Virgin Media, which account for 90 per cent of all broadband connections. Ofcom found that speeds were significantly lower in the evening; average speeds between 8pm and 10pm were 3.7 Mbit/s. Rural homes received significantly slower speeds (3.3Mbit/s), than city homes (4.6Mbit/s).

Ofcom said 83 per cent of customers were satisfied with their broadband service, but of the 9 per cent that were dissatisfied, speed was their biggest complaint.

It said advertising was a matter for the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA). Steve Weller, marketing director at price comparison service uSwitch.com, said the report was “damning” of the broadband companies.

“They obviously get away with misleading customers with their ‘up to 8 meg’ – customers either never receive 8 meg and most customers get much lower than the advertised speeds,” he said.

People in rural areas in particular are being treated like second-rate customers.”

America Unwired: Americans Flocking To Internet with Wireless Devices July 28, 2009

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According to a recently conducted survey done by the Pew Research Institute, the use of mobile handsets for accessing the Web has increased 73% since late 2007.

More particularly mobile handsets are on the rise as a means for accessing the Internet, the report noted.

On a typical day in April 2009, 19% of Americans used their cell phones or smartphones to go online, a 73% increase over December 2007.

According to the report, 32% of Americans have used a mobile device for e-mailing, instant messaging, or seeking information, compared to 24% at the end of 2007.

According to Pew’s John Horrigan, the author of the report, “Mobile access strengthens the three pillars of online engagement: connecting with others, satisfying information queries, and sharing content with others.

“With access in their pockets, many Americans are ‘on the fly’ consumers and producers of digital information.”

The most active users of the mobile Internet, according to the report, were African Americans; 29% go online with a handheld device on an average day, compared to 17% of white Americans.

The report found that African Americans are 70% more likely than white Americans to have accessed the Internet from a handheld device.

“The notion of a digital divide for African Americans has some resonance when thinking about the wireline Internet,” said Horrigan. “But when you introduce the mobile Internet, the picture changes and African Americans are the pace setters.”

Non-voice data activities are also becoming popular lures for accessing the Internet with mobile devices. These non-voice activities include checking e-mail, sending or receiving text messages, taking pictures, playing games, accessing the Web, recording videos, instant messaging, watching videos, getting maps or directions. or playing music,

The report is based on an April 2009 survey of 2,253 Americans.

For more information:
http://pewresearch.org/pubs/1287/wireless-internet-use-mobile-access