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Stony Plain Records Announces an August 24 Release Date for New CDs From World-Class Guitarists Duke Robillard – Passport to the Blues–and Ronnie Earl – Spread the Love June 25, 2010

Posted by David W. King in Blues, Guitarists, Guitars, Music, Music News, Music News Updates, New Releases.
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EDMONTON, AB – Stony Plain Records announces an August 24 U.S. release date for new CDs from blues guitar masters Duke Robillard, Passport to the Blues; and Ronnie Earl, Spread the Love. Stony Plain Records is distributed in the U.S. by ADA.

Duke Robillard continues a fantastic year of successes, including winning yet another Blues Music Award in May from the Blues Foundation as “Best Traditional Male Blues Artist,” and a Grammy nomination for his last CD, Stomp! The Blues Tonight.

Never an artist to stand pat, Duke Robillard has released previous albums that have saluted his love for jump blues, jazz, swing, and even exotica. With Passport to the Blues, Duke puts his personal stamp on music that the new CD’s liner notes describe as his “grittiest roots – dirty, gutty, houserockin’, shack-shakin’, finger-bustin’, down-in-the-bottom git-tar blues.”

“This all-blues album was a chance for me to reach back deep into the soul of what I do and let out a lot of steam and emotion – especially on the guitar tracks,” says Robillard.
“I played a lot of my solos live with the band in the studio, just like we would on the road. The energy was fantastic. Making the album felt magical.”

And what a band it is, featuring Duke’s former Roomful of Blues bandmate Doug James on tenor and baritone saxes, Bruce Bears on keyboards, Brad Hallen on bass and Mark Teixeira on drums. Along with Robillard’s always on-the-money guitar work and soulful vocals, this unit has crafted another album that’s sure to be lining up for plaudits come awards time.

Passport to the Blues features a dozen tracks, all but one written by Robillard – the single exception being “Make It Rain,” written by Tom Waits (a song Duke played as lead guitarist with Waits on his 2006 tour) and his wife, Kathleen Brennan. In addition to the timeless themes of the blues, the new CD has a decidedly modern take on songs such as “Text Me,” a love song for the digital age, and “Honk Kong Suit,” which deals with the rapid pace of contemporary life. Of special note is the song,” The High Cost of Lovin’,” written in the 1980s by Duke and legendary songwriter Doc Pomus.

As Robillard sums up in the album’s liner notes, “All my life and career I’ve been fascinated by all kinds of roots music. Now I have the career and life I’ve wanted, playing anything that tickles me from country to blues to jazz to rock ‘n’ roll to New Orleans music. As long as it’s roots, I love it all and I can’t get enough.”

During a career that began when he joined Roomful of Blues, Ronnie Earl has charted a course that has led him to become a legendary musician; one recognized around the world for his dynamic and soulful playing. For his sixth Stony Plain album, Spread the Love, Ronnie Earl has raised the bar even further, with 14 instrumental tracks that speak volumes of his amazing fret work, whether on originals or paying tribute to his influences such as Albert Collins (“Backstroke”) and Kenny Burrell (“Chitlins Con Carne), or on the beautifully spiritual ballad written by Duke Pearson, (but perhaps best-known by trumpeter Donald Byrd’s version) “Christo Redentor.”

On his original songs, Earl continues to spread the message of love and hope through his music, which is loaded with the kind of energy, passion, and serious grooves only he can deliver. He tips his hat to others such as Jackie Robinson (“Blues for Jackie Robinson”), Duane Allman (“Skyman”) and with the help of his regular keyboardist, Dave Limina, gives a playful musical nod to legendary pianist Otis Spann on “Spann’s Groove.” The other members of Ronnie’s band, The Broadcasters, are Lorne Entress on drums and Jim Mouradian on bass.

Ronnie Earl has been hailed by musicians and critics alike as one of the premier blues guitarists of his generation. He’s played with such greats as Carlos Santana, Eric Clapton, Earl King, Stevie Ray Vaughan and The Allman Brothers Band.

Reviews of his albums typically become a veritable love-fest, as critics try to come up with new descriptions for his amazing guitar work. “When it’s time for spiritual rejuvenation, it’s time for a visit from Ronnie Earl, pastor at the church of tone. Come in, listen, and be healed,!” – Vintage Guitar. “Blues has no better essayist in taste, tone and tension than Strat magician Ronnie Earl … Earl’s got his mojo working overtime,” –
Guitar World. “Ronnie Earl can still take your breath away … Earl’s playing has remained as inspiring as his humility, gratitude, and altruism.” – Guitar Player. “Earl is at his mesmerizing best when communicating with an audience … The all-instrumental set allows the subtlety of Earl’s genius to shine.” – Boston Herald. “His deeply personal process of squeezing out taut, precise notes during many slow passages makes for riveting listening.” – Downbeat.

For more information, visit www.stonyplainrecords.com.

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