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New Report Shows How Much Record Companies Are “Investing In Music” March 10, 2010

Posted by David W. King in Uncategorized.
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Record companies, large and small, invest around US$5 billion a year in music talent, support a global roster of thousands of artists and typically spend US$1 million to break successful pop acts in major markets.

The figures are published in a new report issued today highlighting the work of major and independent record companies as the principal investors in artists’ careers. Advances, recording, marketing and promotional costs are the biggest items of record company spending on artists, commonly totalling six figure sums.

There are more than 4,000 artists on major record companies’ rosters combined, and many thousands more on independent labels. There is continuous re-investment of revenues derived from successful acts into new talent. It is estimated that one in four artists on record companies’ rosters were signed in the last 12 months.

Record companies are the largest investors in music talent, ploughing around 30% of their sales revenues – around US$5 billion worldwide – into developing and marketing artists. This includes an estimated 16% of sales revenues that is spent on artist and repertoire work (A&R), a proportion that significantly exceeds the proportionate research and development (R&D) expenditure of virtually all other industries. In addition, labels pay significant sums in royalties to featured performers.

Recorded music has a massive economic “ripple effect”, helping generate a broader music sector, including live music, radio, publishing and audio equipment, estimated to be worth US$160 billion annually. IFPI estimates that more than two million people are employed globally in this broader music economy.

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